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Friday Seminar 15 Sept
11.09.2017

Design Considerations of CMOS Micro-heaters to Directly Synthesize Carbon Nanotubes for Gas Sensing Applications

 

Welcome to Friday Seminar 15th September, 12:15 – 13:00

Speaker: PhD Student Avisek Roy
Title: Design Considerations of CMOS Micro-heaters to Directly Synthesize Carbon Nanotubes for Gas Sensing Applications
Room: F2-20 (Research Park)



Abstract:

Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) have unique one dimensional structure and exceptional properties [1] which enable them to achieve high sensitivity, selectivity and stability [2]. These nanomaterials provide smart and ultra-sensing functionalities with integration of CMOS circuits. In this micro-nano scale integration, CNTs work as active material and CMOS circuits can be used to obtain and process signals.
At USN, CNTs are synthesized by CVD process, where very high temperature (~900 °C) is required at the local CNT growth location. This high temperature can be generated by local resistive heating of a micro-structure. Our previous works showed successful MEMS-CNT integration for gas sensing [3]. Current focus of our project is to eliminate MEMS and directly integrate CNTs in CMOS since MEMS-CMOS integration approaches are complex and consumes time, making the entire process expensive for mass production. Direct integration of CNTs in CMOS will open the door for commercially manufacturing low-cost CNT based smart sensors.
A major challenge for CMOS-CNT integration is the high temperature requirement (~900 °C) during the CNT synthesis process, which can compromise the functionalities of CMOS circuits. By local resistive heating on one of the CMOS conductive layers along with several CMOS post processing, CNT synthesis will be possible. Therefore, CMOS micro-heaters have been modelled and simulated to investigate the achievability of the designs on actual chips. This paper will present the design considerations of the simulated CMOS micro-heaters in terms of avoiding global heating in the microsystem and maintaining mechanical integrity of the designs.

 



     

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